GWENDOLYN HOFF

(708) 212 - 3166

Gwendolyn Hoff
Richton Park, Illinois 60471, United States
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HISTORICAL FICTION

1896-1959


Contents.pdf                     140.3 KB
L​atobsd01_-_Copy.pdf       324.4 KB

THE ABOVE file Are a SAMPLE OF LATOBSD
You can now buy THE LIFE AND TIMES OF A BLACK SOUTHERN DOCTOR directly from the author (me), signed for $19, including the shipping. Hardcover available for $7 dollars more. 

​Gwenny

THE LIFE AND TIMES OF A

BLACK SOUTHERN DOCTOR

1896-1959

​I. THE SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR
II. 25TH PRESIDENT: WILLIAM MCKINLEY
III. THE GALVESTON HURRICANE–1900
IV. 26TH PRESIDENT: THEODORE ROOSEVELT
V. GEORGE EASTMAN (SISTER JUDITH)
VI. SUFFRAGETTE: EMMELINE PANKHURST
VII. The San Francisco Earthquake–1906
VIII. Playwright: Sir James Barrie
IX. World War I
X. Mary Pickford–Early Hollywood
XI. The Pacific Clipper Flying Boats–PanAm
XII. Roswell, New Mexico: Area 51

Forward

THE LIFE AND TIMES OF A BLACK SOUTHERN DOCTOR

by Gwendolyn Kim  Hoff


The Life and Times of a Black Southern Doctor, or LATOBSD as it will be referred to from here on in this condensation, is a saga of life in the panhandle of Florida from 1896 to 1956 and a bit beyond. Doctor Alpha Omega Campbell was an actual practicing physician in and around Tallahassee between 1913 and 1956. In 1956, at the age of 67, A.O. Campbell was convicted of manslaughter in the death of a Jacksonville mother of two, after allegedly performing a criminal abortion that eventually results in her dying. On in years and eyeing semi-retirement, he is sent Florida’s hardest prison for four of his remaining years.

​LATOBSD begins 1 ½ years into the doctor’s incarceration at the time of his dear wife’s funeral. Maggie Lou Campbell did not do well with her husband hundreds of miles away. She had been watching their empire of wealth and real estate crumble around her, spurred on by numerous jealous conspirators who position themselves, like sharks around a school of hapless fish.


It is from that point backward, I transport the reader back in time, before Maggie Lou was conceived by her multi-racial mother with the help of one of Leon County’s most respected grocers and back when Alfrey (A.O.) Campbell’s family was beholding to a deep-rooted plantation owner; some called it slavery in the post emancipation south.


From this time forward, I undertake the task of fictionalizing a seemingly immeasurable share of people and events. Most of this recounting of the doctor’s affairs is true to history, used as a guidepost for the seventy-some year story line. There are many people amongst the ensemble that closely resemble many of those that truly did exist, back when the delineation between black and white was beginning to show signs of gray. Yet as close as the Campbell’s pushed that line towards equality, a stronger force bludgeoned them back where “they belonged”.


As tempting as it was to make this biographical, I could not. Case in point, the considerable liberty taken, especially as it applies to the more famous characters I have inserted in this moderately loosely-tied account of what really happened. If you think historical fiction is tough staying true to historical events, multiply that by two and you have a biography; there will always be someone who says: ‘That isn’t the way it happened.’


So as we traipse our way into the wonderful world of fiction, consider this list of names and events (In order of their appearance):










Whoowah Nellie. What does any of this have to do with a black Southern doctor you ask? That is what makes history fun, even if much of this stuff did not come down quite the way I write it. I promise to dedicate the 20th chapter to the process of sorting the beef from the bull; the inconsistencies you all will gladly point out while reading along as the decades peel away.


The bottom line is that LATOBSD is not just about the doctor.